Natural health: Sarcoidosis and bruising

Q. I have been told that there is no treatment for sarcoidosis. Is there anything you can suggest, even if it isn’t an outright cure?

This is quite correct — there are no treatments in conventional or natural medicine that have been proven to cure sarcoidosis. It is considered to be chronic and progressive, particularly affecting the lungs, lymph glands, skin, and liver, where nodules are formed. Other symptoms may include fever, fatigue, and weight loss.

The cause for sarcoidosis is also a mystery, with scientists investigating as to whether it is a result of exposure to a certain bacteria, virus, or environmental pollutant, dietary in origin, or if genetic inheritance play a role.

The good news is that in many cases, sarcoidosis will actually vanish as quickly as it appeared, with no apparent reason. This typically happens after a year or two, but about 10% of sufferers have persistent symptoms and it may even develop further into a condition where steroid treatment is considered to be the only viable option.

Melatonin, only available by prescription, has been used to regulate the immune system and slow down the nodule growth. This hormone is usually associated with treating insomnia and jet lag, since it helps to induce and regulate sleep-wake cycles, however it is also thought to reduce the accumulation of abnormal cells.

If you do find a health practitioner who is either aware of this melatonin therapy, or willing to investigate further, the dosage used in trials to reduce sarcoid nodules in the lungs was 20mg of melatonin daily. This dosage was also found to trigger a reduction or even complete disappearance of skin lesions.

Of course, what you choose to eat and drink does play a key role in the healing of any condition — eating a balanced wholefood diet, with plenty of fresh produce, avoiding foods that are highly processed, and keeping any foods or ingredients to which you have a known sensitivity, intolerance, or allergy reaction off the menu.

I bruise very easily, which seems to have become worse in my 40s. I don’t take any medications, and I am in otherwise good health. Are there any remedies I can take to fix this problem, as it is quite unsightly?

To begin, it’s vital that you organise a visit to your doctor to rule out any underlying health conditions, despite the fact that you experience no obvious problems other than the bruising.

Individuals who bruise easily are typically prone to weakened blood vessels as a result of medications (particularly aspirin, prednisone, prednisolone, and oral contraceptive pills), clotting deficiency, or related diseases such as haemophilia or leukaemia.

Bruising is common in the elderly due to weakening of tissues and vessels as a part of the ageing process, but you are far from being in this category. It is also worth noting that diabetics can have patches of what looks like bruising, but in fact is a skin discolouration as a result of insulin resistance.

Bruising occurs when tiny blood vessels (capillaries) in an affected area are damaged to a point where the red blood cells leak out. The change from purple/black/blue through to brown/green/yellow colouration is a result of the blood cells and bilirubin pigment being metabolised by the body.

Vitamin C is one of the best nutrients to treat easy bruising. Taken together with bioflavonoids to maximize the effectiveness and absorption of vitamin C, it works to strengthen tissues and vessels, and promote healing. Taking as little as 2,000mg of vitamin C daily, along with bioflavonoids such as hesperidin or rutin, will likely sort out your problem after only a few weeks.

Solgar has created a formulation of 500mg vitamin C combined with 500mg of bioflavonoids. You need to take one capsule, four times daily, for two to four weeks, then you can take one capsule twice daily as a long-term maintenance measure.

Solgar’s Hy-Bio tablets are available from health stores (also see www.hereshealth.ie) where 50 tablets cost €10.10 or 250 tablets cost €38.29.

10 best foods for you when you have sarcoidosis

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Antioxidant rich foods

Sell inflammation causes the problem and so antioxidants may help you to protect your healthy cells from such damage. Antioxidants are good for you because they neutralize free radicals. These free radicals occur during your digestion process, tobacco smoke inhalation and exposure to radiation. These radicals can damage your cells. Protect your cells with antioxidant rich foods like tomatoes, berries, sweet peepers and other fruits and vegetables.

Turmeric

Turmeric has anti-inflammatory properties. And so it is good for patients suffering from sarcoidosis. You can use it as a spice after drying and grounding. It is a common spice in Asian countries. You can also take turmeric as a dietary supplement. It will reduce cell inflammations.

Olive oil

Olive oil is a very good element for your diet if you are suffering from sarcoidosis. It strengthens your immune system and as a result you suffer from less number of diseases. If your immune system is malfunctioning, it may damage your cells. And that is what happens in case of sarcoidosis. Olive oil contains fatty acids which may be able to help you to balance your immune system. You can use olive oil for cooking or can also use it as dressing for salads.

Magnesium

If you eat foods that contain magnesium in them, they can help you in fighting sarcoidosis. Magnesium supports cell function, which may work against sarcoidosis. The foods that are rich in magnesium are avocados, oats, corn, soy, potatoes, brown rice and others. Magnesium is also essential for your body because it helps in about 300 body functions. It is very essential for the right cell performance.

Water

Many researchers believe that inhaled toxins may result in cell damage and later cause sarcoidosis. If you keep yourself hydrated with lots of water, the negative effects of such toxins may be reduced. That will help you to flush out the toxins from the body and thereby help you to get rid of the inhaled toxins.

Calcium

If you are experiencing bone loss, calcium may help you to fight that. In treatment of sarcoidosis, corticosteroids such as methotrexate or glucocorticoid are used. Such steroids can create issues with calcium metabolism. As a result, people suffering from sarcoidosis have higher risk of bone thinning problem. Problem with calcium metabolism have been associated for a long time with sarcoidosis. About 40 to 55% of cases have reported such problems. The solution for the problem is to increase your intake of calcium, because you need calcium for building bones. However, you need to consult your doctor before you take calcium if you are suffering from sarcoidosis.

Bromelain

Bromelain is an enzyme which is available in pineapple. It can reduce inflammation. It is good for you because it can also reduce the inflammation that causes sarcoidosis development.

Strontium

Strontium is also a sarcoidosis friendly diet. It is also effective against osteoporosis and so it is good for sarcoidosis patients who suffer from the possibility of lower bone mass.

Soy

Soy is a very good for people suffering from sarcoidosis. It contains isoflavones and as a result it helps in prevention of bone loss. Soy isoflavones can help you to increase the bone mass. Even though the effectiveness is not yet proved in the research, but there is no harm in doing it.

Vitamin C

Vitamins C or citric acid can help you to have a better health when you’re suffering from sarcoidosis. It is also beneficial for you because it prevents kidney stones, which is often associated with sarcoidosis. Citric acid is available in high amount in citrus fruit.

5 Facts about Scoliosis Every Parent Should Know

a pediatrician screens a boy for scoliosis

Scoliosis is a common spine condition often found in adolescents. Roughly 3 million new cases of the condition are diagnosed in the United States each year, with a majority of them identified as idiopathic scoliosis — a type of scoliosis that presents in children between 10 to 12 years old.

Below, Paul Sponseller, M.D., pediatric orthopaedic expert and director of the Johns Hopkins Division of Pediatric Orthopaedic Surgery, provides five facts about scoliosis that all parents should know before their child’s next physical.

1. Early diagnosis is key.

It’s important for parents to make sure their children are receiving regular checkups so that conditions like scoliosis can be diagnosed and managed early. “If scoliosis can be diagnosed before the child has a growth spurt,” says Sponseller, “the provider can determine a treatment plan that prevents a bigger curve from forming during times of growth.”

Common signs of scoliosis include uneven shoulders or hips, but it is generally a painless condition that may go unnoticed until a routine exam or physical. “Children around the age of 10 to 12 are usually becoming more private,” Sponseller notes, “and parents are no longer involved in activities like bathing or dressing them, when they may have otherwise noticed a change.”

2. Most cases of scoliosis have no known cause.

Parents: It’s not your fault if your child is diagnosed with scoliosis. “Parents tend to ask what they could have done to prevent scoliosis,” says Sponseller, “but scoliosis is a very interesting disease, because there is currently no known cause or prevention method.”

It’s also very common for parents to ask if bad posture or heavy backpacks could have caused their child’s scoliosis. While these two things may be associated with other spine and back conditions, they do not cause scoliosis, Sponseller says.

3. Scoliosis runs in families.

“When parents hear scoliosis runs in families, they often say, ‘But nobody in our family has it,’” says Sponseller. “But in reality, it’s likely that someone does or did and it went unnoticed because it was a very mild case.” Of course, there are also instances where a child is the first in the family to develop the condition.

4. Only a small percentage of scoliosis patients require treatment.

“I see a number of patients who automatically assume they will need treatment for their scoliosis, but only a small percentage — about 30 percent — require bracing, and an even smaller percent — about 10 percent — of patients actually require surgery,” Sponseller assures.

If your child is diagnosed with scoliosis, Sponseller says not to be scared. “Scoliosis is a very manageable condition when diagnosed early.” For children who are still growing, an external torso brace can be used to prevent further worsening of the scoliosis while the child grows. Even when wearing a brace, most children live normal lives and participate in the same activities as their peers.

5. Surgery, if needed, has good outcomes.

If your child turns out to be among them, Sponseller — who performs over 150 spine surgeries a year — advises parents that while it may be a hard decision to make on behalf of your child, having surgery sooner rather than later is better. When done early, the surgery tends to be simpler, as less of the spine needs to be fused. Perhaps more importantly, he says, is your child being in good overall health and having the support of his or her family during recovery. Parents should also work with their child’s school to determine a plan for the time the child will miss during recovery — usually one to two months

Sarcoidosis: Lung Biopsy in Certain Cases May Help Control Complications at Royal Brompton

It is important to perform a lung biopsy when a change in chest X-ray is seen during pulmonary sarcoidosis monitoring, according to Japanese scientists in the study “Multicentric Castleman’s disease developing during follow-up of sarcoidosis.

The biospy could rule out or lead to appropriate treatment of the rare multicentric Castleman’s disease (MCD).

The study recently published in Respirology Case Reports presented the case of a 60-year-old woman who did not express issues or concerns about her medical, family or smoking history. During her health exam doctors identified an enlargement in the lymph nodes (bilateral hilar lymphadenopathy) of her lung via a chest X-ray. Following a lung biopsy, the woman was diagnosed with stage 2 pulmonary sarcoidosis.

The shadow detected on her chest X-ray, which corresponded to a lymph node enlargement, disappeared without treatment. Eight years later, however, other shadows were seen on her chest X-ray and a second lung biopsy was performed. This time, the woman was diagnosed with pulmonary sarcoidosis complicated by MCD.

MCD is characterized by a hyperactive immune system. Excessive levels of pro-inflammatory chemicals (cytokines) are released and immune B- and T-cells proliferate leading to multiple organ system dysfunction.

The researchers reported that the patient was taking steroids to treat her MCD.

“It is important to differentiate the disease in order to initiate appropriate treatment,” wrote Dr. Tetsuro Sawata, of the Division of Pulmonary Medicine, Department of Medicine, Jichi Medical University in Tochigi, Japan, and colleagues in the article. “Pulmonary sarcoidosis tends to react well to steroid treatment.”

Sarcoidosis can be associated with many diseases. Malignant lymphoma is one of them and has been reported as a complication of sarcoidosis in previous studies. MCD has rarely been associated with sarcoidosis. Only two other cases have been reported and the relationship between the two diseases is not fully understood.

Researchers concluded: “It  is important to proceed with testing via thoracoscopic lung biopsy to rule out the rare possibility of complication with MCD.”

Hopkins doctors hopeful for sarcoidosis cure

— Three years ago, lung researchers at Johns Hopkins Hospital identified a possible protein trigger responsible for sarcoidosis, a potentially fatal inflam- matory disease marked by tiny clumps of inflammatory cells that each year leaves deep, grainy scars on the lungs, lymph nodes, skin and almost all major organs in hundreds of thousands of Americans.

The disorder, has been considered by many to be a mystery, but strikes mostly young adults and disproportionately affects African Americans.

David Moller, M.D.,  professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the sarcoidosis clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Courtesy photo

David Moller, M.D., professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the sarcoidosis clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

“Symptoms include fever, rash, fatigue and breathing problems,” said pulmonologist David Moller, M.D., a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the sarcoidosis clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. “What I tell patients is that sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that affects people in different ways and we don’t know what triggers this inflammation, and it can occur in a number of areas in the body.”

Some patients, who are gravely ill from the disease, also are affected with weight loss and feel bad enough to see a doctor before much damage is done to the lungs or other organs, said Dr. Edward Chen, the assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University. “For these people, their long term outlook is good. However, some may have a much more gradual onset of symptoms, such as lingering dry cough, or more mild symptoms, and they may only see a doctor after months have passed and only because they finally realize that they have been coughing so long.”

Additionally, some patients may not exhibit any symptoms and very little activity of the sarcoidosis, and evidence of the disease only appears when tests are obtained for other reasons, according to medical officials.

“A text book example would be a patient that ends up in the emergency room after a car accident and then has a chest x-ray simply because of the accident. On the x-rays there is an abnormality that needs a biopsy to make sure it’s not cancer and some of these patients turn out to have sarcoidosis,” Dr. Chen pointed out.

While there are no therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Moller says that clinical observations are important and patient responses differ.

Corticosteroids, such as prednisone are an effective and first line drug treatment.

Moller noted that other therapies, such as the antifolate metabolite, Methotrexate, can also be used as it contains both immuno-suppressant and anti-inflammatory properties and is widely used in the management of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, cirrhosis and severe resistant asthma.

There are other specific drug treatments, but patients should visit their doctors to determine which is best, Johns Hopkins officials said.

It has been estimated that sarcoidosis reduces the life expectancy in approximately five percent of cases. The most frequent causes of death are pulmonary, cardiac, neurological and hepatic disease, Moller said.

The link between sarcoidosis and overproduction of the suspected protein trigger, called serum amyloid A, was revealed in 2010, after a six-year investigation encompassing more than two dozen laboratory experiments, including some on diseased lung tissue samples from 86 patients in the Baltimore area.

— “The increase in production of serum amyloid A explains for the first time how inflammation can persist in the lungs without being triggered by an active infection,” Moller said.

Dr. Chen, the study’s lead investigator, says the findings also cleared the path for developing drug treatments or vaccines that can block serum amyloid A from binding to cell receptors and kicking off inflammation.

“Not only have we shown [in the study] that serum amyloid A is a key protein trigger in sarcoidosis, but we also have evidence that the resulting

inflammation is dependent on binding the protein at toll-like receptor-2, which opens up a host of possibilities that drugs blocking this binding site could prove an effective treatment for this disease,” Dr. Chen said.

Dr. Moller says that his team has plans to use the study results to create diagnostic tests that could better predict which people with the disease are likely to heal on their own or are more likely to suffer persistent inflammation, which can lead to scarring, difficulty breathing, and heart failure that can only be fixed by lung transplantation.

The impact of sarcoidosis on life expectancy depends on whether the disease has caused significant permanent damage to the lungs or other organ(s) where the sarcoidosis has been found.

“For mild cases of sarcoidosis, this disease may not have any effect on life expectancy,” Dr. Chen said. “For those patients with severe lung disease needing oxygen, or other severe organ damage from sarcoidosis, such as heart failure, then they will be expected to have an increased risk of passing from complications from their sarcoidosis.”

Struggle To live- Sarcoidosis – Carla Malcoms Story

I started having “weird” symptoms in March of 2006, with swelling of the face being the worst, so I went to my family doctor. He put me on an anti-inflammatory and sent me on my way. The symptoms got worse. My symptoms included: swelling in my eyes, face and neck; muscle cramps and twitching; dry eyes; night sweats; and fever. I went back to the doctor. He sent me to a specialist (I can’t remember what kind) who took a biopsy of the “fluid” in my face. It came back inconclusive. After many more back and forths with the doctor, he told me he wanted to admit me to the hospital to have them perform tests to determine what was going on. I went to the hospital, but they wouldn’t admit me because they said all I had was edema. I went back to the doctor. He referred me to a rheumatologist who took many vials of blood. 
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Several days later, the rheumatologist told me that they ruled out Mumps, Mono, Sjogren’s Syndrome, and a slew of others that I can’t recall. And the best diagnosis they could come up with was Sarcoidosis. I was told that this would be something I would have forever but that I may never have another symptom with it. So he put me on a 60-day prescription of Prednisone. After that 60 days, all my symptoms were gone, and I felt as well as I had before all the symptoms appeared. All was well … or so I thought.
Fast forward to April 9, 2013. I was chasing my puppy so she wouldn’t run out in the street (maybe 15 yards of running), and I was so out of air that I didn’t think I could WALK back to my house. I dismissed the notion that maybe it was because I was out of shape because I know my body, and this was different. So I went in to see my family doctor (I have a different one that the one I had in 2006). I asked her to test me for asthma. She took a chest X-Ray and had me breathe into a spirometer. The chest X-Ray had to be sent off, but she saw the results immediately from the spirometer, which confirmed asthma. She prescribed an inhaler and sent me on my way.
On April 18, 2013, my doctor called with the results of my chest X-ray, which revealed enlarged lymph nodes in my lungs and chest. She wanted me to have a CT scan the next morning, which I did. She called me the following Monday morning, April 22, 2013, and said that the CT scan confirmed the existence of the enlarged lymph nodes and wanted me to see a pulmomary specialist the same day, which I did. (Little did I know at the time that she suspected lung cancer.) 
After reviewing my CT scan, the lung doctor wanted me to have a bronchoscopy to biopsy some of the lung tissue, so that was scheduled for April 25, 2013. As I was still in the recovery room, he explained to my husband that whatever was going on with my lungs had been there for quite some time as there was some damage to my lower left lobe. And the airway leading into my left lung was only open about the size of a pencil head. We had to wait a week before we got the results.
In the meantime, the lung doctor wanted to give me a breathing test, which I did on May 1, 2013. Another confirmation that my airway was constricted, and he put me on Advair and Albuterol.
The following day, my husband and I met with the lung doctor to go over the results. He said, “The good news is it isn’t cancer; the bad news is it’s Sarcoidosis.” There’s that dreaded word again! He said at that time he wanted to treat it with a 12 day taper prescription of Prednisone and scheduled me to come back in four months for another breathing test and chest X-Ray. He also scheduled me to have blood work to see if it showed up in any other organs and told me to see an ophthalmologist to make sure it hadn’t gotten in my eyes. Both of those came back normal, thank God!
On Monday, May 13, 2013, (day 11 of the Prednisone), I noticed a burning, tingling sensation on the left side of my face that would come and go, sometimes mild, sometimes painful. So on  May 15, 2013, I went back to my family doctor. She ordered a Brain MRI and also wanted me to have another CT Scan (of my abdomen and pelvic area this time) as the previous CT scan showed enlarged lymph nodes in my stomach, which she never told me about. 
That same day, I had the Brain MRI (and I pray to God that I never have to have one of those again!). And the following day on May 16, 2013, I had the CT Scan. The brain MRI came back normal; the CT scan confirmed the existence of enlarged lymph nodes in my abdomen. At this point, my family doctor wants me to follow up with a rheumatologist, and I’m in the process of trying to find a doctor in the Dallas area (or even in the Texas area) who KNOWS about this disease, not just one who TREATS it.
The latest episode occurred last night while at the movies with my friends. Out of nowhere, I had an asthma attack where I couldn’t get any breath. That was my first such episode and hopefully my last. It scared all of us. 
The most frustrating part of this disease for me, as I’m sure it is for others suffering, is the unknown. It seems like after being fairly healthy all my life, all of a sudden, an onset of symptoms just appear out of nowhere. And although I appear fine, I feel like there’s a battle raging on the inside of me, and there’s not much I can do about it.
I empathize with the Sarcoidosis sufferer who has little to no symptoms, and I empathize with those who have many. And I pray for a cure. I’m thankful that my faith is strong.  God has carried me these last several weeks during all this testing, and I know without Him, I would be a basket case. But instead, I have had incredible peace. This peace and hope I send out to all of the other Sarcoidosis sufferers. Blessings to all!

Thank you,s

Autoimmune Hemolytic Anemia in Sarcoidosis Patient Successfully Treated with Rituxan, CellCept Combo

Patients with sarcoidosis may develop a condition known as autoimmune hemolytic anemia, in which the red blood cells are prematurely destroyed by the immune system. Although this is not well documented, researchers at Warwick Hospital in England have reported the case of a patient who exhibited both illnesses.

Their study, “Steroid Refractory Autoimmune Haemolytic Anaemia Secondary to Sarcoidosis Successfully Treated with Rituximab and Mycophenolate Mofetil,” published in the journal Case Reports of Hematology, shows that these patients may be effectively treated with B-cell depletion therapies such as Rituxan (rituximab) and CellCept (mycophenolate mofetil).

Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a condition that develops in 3 out of 100,000 people per year, and it is associated with poor outcomes. It is characterized by the production of antibodies that target proteins in the red blood cells, resulting in their premature degradation with the development of severe anemia. These patients often require blood transfusions; however, these can be problematic because the donor red blood cells are consumed rapidly and are difficult to match to the patient’s blood type.

Although its symptoms are not well-recognized in sarcoidosis patients, the authors of the study report the case of a 30-year-old women who had both diseases.

The patient had a two-day history of progressive dizziness, shortness of breath, jaundice, and abdominal pain. Clinical observation revealed lymphadenopathy, a common symptom of sarcoidosis, and splenomegaly, or enlarged spleen. Further analysis also revealed severe hemolytic anemia.

The patient received blood transfusions to treat her severe anemia, and then started on immunosuppressive steroid treatment with high-dose Prelone (prednisolone), which was reduced after two weeks when hemolysis (red blood cell destruction) was no longer observed and the patient did not require more blood transfusions.

The hemolysis recurred after four weeks and the patient was started on Rituxan and Imuran (azathioprine), but Imuran caused severe side effects and was replaced by CellCept. The patient responded well to the therapy, showing decreased lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly after three months on CellCept and Rituxan therapy, which allowed clinicians to reduce the dose of steroids that were being administered.

Although more studies are required to understand the relationship between these diseases, researchers believe that the same subsets of immune cells are involved in the development of both sarcoidosis and hemolytic anemia, which may explain why some patients get both illnesses at the same time.

This means that therapeutic agents such as Rituxan, which target the immune cells known to be involved in both diseases, are promising approaches for the treatment of these patients. But given that Rituxan often takes 8 to 16 weeks to induce a clinical response, other agents that inhibit the proliferation of immune cells, such as CellCept, may be used in combination with Rituxan to help reduce the dose of steroids in a timely manner.

The authors caution, however, that “effective treatment of autoimmune hemolysis in sarcoid patients is dependent on a better understanding of the pathophysiological link between sarcoidosis and hemolytic anaemia.”

Inside Inflammation: Sarcoidosis Must Read This Info

Coping with an ‘invisible disease,’ and turning to peers for support

In the medical world, inflammation causes a litany of health issues. Ranging from arthritis to bowel disease, from skin disease to cancer. It occurs as a result of a change in our immune system.

What is sarcoidosis

Sarcoidosis is such an illness that results from inflammation. A rather common condition, sarcoidosis is an immune disease that causes abnormal inflammation of cells in the body. Sarcoidosis can affect the lungs, eyes, and other organs – including the heart and brain in the most severe cases.

Dr. Daniel Culver, a leader in the treatment of sarcoidosis and a staff physician for the Respiratory Institute at Cleveland Clinic, empathizes with his patients.

“People look at them and say, ‘you don’t look sick’, but the truth is, these patients are very ill,” Dr. Culver says. “It’s difficult to cope with something that many people don’t understand.”

What’s more, the disease is not fully understood by researchers, and extremely difficult to diagnose. The cause of the disease is unknown, but studies have shown that it is more common among African Americans and females, and often occurs before the age of forty.

Sarcoidosis is often overlooked

On average, people with sarcoidosis in their lungs will pay five visits to the doctor before being properly diagnosed. Almost all patients have lung, or chest symptoms including chest pain, dry cough, and shortness of breath.

“Sarcoidosis is often overlooked because it manifests in a number of different ways, and presents itself with a number of different symptoms depending on the inflamed area of the body,” says Dr. Culver. “Physicians assume bronchitis or asthma when they hear wheezing, or worse, cancer, when they see enlarged lymph nodes in the lungs.”

How sarcoidosis can be diagnosed

Diagnosis usually requires an X-ray or CAT scan followed by a biopsy, and the biopsy doesn’t prove the existence of the disease until other conditions are excluded.

With all of the complexity involved, patients are often left with questions on how to cope.

At this point, there is no cure for sarcoidosis, but one-half to two-thirds of patients with sarcoidosis will have the disease go away on its own over time, says Dr. Culver.

Treatment is available

“Symptoms are able to be suppressed in most cases,” says Dr. Culver. “By offering different treatment options, patients can go on living a more comfortable life, with fewer symptoms. Sarcoidosis can be something you have in the background, not something that defines your life, for most people.”

Steroid treatments as well as newer medications like methotrexate, leflunomide, infliximab and others – have been shown to be effective in reversing the symptoms of the disease.

Dr. Culver is positive about the outlook for curing the disease. “Research continues, and our sarcoidosis community is dedicated to exploring new medications to combat inflammatory immune diseases,” he says.

Online forums and conferences

Sarcoidosis sufferers often find solace in ‘talking’ to one another in online forums to legitimize their disease.

“These patients have a real sense of community,” Dr. Culver says. “No one understands their suffering better than they do – and it’s important for them to know they’re not alone.”

Patients with sarcoidosis had a rare opportunity to meet one another in person after connecting online at this year’s World Association of Sarcoidosis and Other Granulomatous Disorders North American Conference, Oct. 4-6, 2012.
IF YOU LIKE THIS POST PLEASE LIKE MY PAGE Sarcoidosis

Hopkins doctors hopeful for sarcoidosis cure

— Three years ago, lung researchers at Johns Hopkins Hospital identified a possible protein trigger responsible for sarcoidosis, a potentially fatal inflam- matory disease marked by tiny clumps of inflammatory cells that each year leaves deep, grainy scars on the lungs, lymph nodes, skin and almost all major organs in hundreds of thousands of Americans.

The disorder, has been considered by many to be a mystery, but strikes mostly young adults and disproportionately affects African Americans.

David Moller, M.D.,  professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the sarcoidosis clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

Courtesy photo

David Moller, M.D., professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the sarcoidosis clinic at Johns Hopkins Hospital.

“Symptoms include fever, rash, fatigue and breathing problems,” said pulmonologist David Moller, M.D., a professor at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and director of the sarcoidosis clinic at The Johns Hopkins Hospital. “What I tell patients is that sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease that affects people in different ways and we don’t know what triggers this inflammation, and it can occur in a number of areas in the body.”

Some patients, who are gravely ill from the disease, also are affected with weight loss and feel bad enough to see a doctor before much damage is done to the lungs or other organs, said Dr. Edward Chen, the assistant professor at Johns Hopkins University. “For these people, their long term outlook is good. However, some may have a much more gradual onset of symptoms, such as lingering dry cough, or more mild symptoms, and they may only see a doctor after months have passed and only because they finally realize that they have been coughing so long.”

Additionally, some patients may not exhibit any symptoms and very little activity of the sarcoidosis, and evidence of the disease only appears when tests are obtained for other reasons, according to medical officials.

“A text book example would be a patient that ends up in the emergency room after a car accident and then has a chest x-ray simply because of the accident. On the x-rays there is an abnormality that needs a biopsy to make sure it’s not cancer and some of these patients turn out to have sarcoidosis,” Dr. Chen pointed out.

While there are no therapies approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), Moller says that clinical observations are important and patient responses differ.

Corticosteroids, such as prednisone are an effective and first line drug treatment.

Moller noted that other therapies, such as the antifolate metabolite, Methotrexate, can also be used as it contains both immuno-suppressant and anti-inflammatory properties and is widely used in the management of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, cirrhosis and severe resistant asthma.

There are other specific drug treatments, but patients should visit their doctors to determine which is best, Johns Hopkins officials said.

It has been estimated that sarcoidosis reduces the life expectancy in approximately five percent of cases. The most frequent causes of death are pulmonary, cardiac, neurological and hepatic disease, Moller said.

The link between sarcoidosis and overproduction of the suspected protein trigger, called serum amyloid A, was revealed in 2010, after a six-year investigation encompassing more than two dozen laboratory experiments, including some on diseased lung tissue samples from 86 patients in the Baltimore area.

What Is The Best Sarcoidosis Diet Plan To Follow?

onthespot178
onthespot178

The list of foods below is simply a start…we’ve had people with all different forms of inflammatory chronic disease get great results following our complete healthy lifestyle plan.  I share more about it below and hope that this information helps those looking for a Sarcoidosis diet plan that works.

First of all, for those of you who don’t know, my husband was diagnosed with Sarcoidosis in August 2014 and because of our “protocol” if you will, he’s been in remission since 2014.

So this has been a question I’ve heard thousands of times over the years and one I’ve dedicated 3 chapters and 3 audios of my Education Beats Medication wellness series to.  Diet is a big piece of the puzzle to your healing.  When it comes to the best Sarcoidosis diet plan, I’ve researched and re-researched exactly what to eat and what to avoid but I must say that everyone is different.  What food is right for one, may be wrong for another and that’s why every person must have a food intolerance test.  It’s just that simple.

Although this is true, there are some very important basics to follow on your Sarcoidosis diet.  Here are some of the foods I recommend and my husband has used as part of his “Sarcoidosis Natural Treatment Plan” which has been successful for him and numerous other people suffering with chronic inflammatory illnesses.

Sarcoidosis Diet Plan

Sarcoidosis diet basics:  Sarcoidosis is an inflammatory disease which causes granulous tumors to form in any organ of the body; eyes, skin, brain, heart, lungs, lymph, liver, etc. etc.  Thus you need to eat a diet high in anti-inflammatory foods.  To check just how “inflamed” the foods you eat are, you can go to nutritiondata.com and enter the foods you eat to see how you are doing.

Below you see a number after each food…this is the IF or Inflammation Factor.  Foods with positive IF rating are considered anti-inflammatory and those with negative IF ratings are considered inflammatory.  I’ll discuss a few that I personally disagree with and think we should eat more of after your read through the list of those that you may want to eat as part of you Sarcoidosis diet.

BEST ANTI-INFLAMMATORY FRUITS

  • Avocados, raw  +181
  • Cantaloupe, raw    +76
  • Grapefruit, raw, pink and red   +18
  • Guava, raw   +131
  • Kiwi fruit, (Chinese gooseberries), fresh, raw   +34
  • Lemons, raw, without peel   +19
  • Papaya, raw   +33
  • Pineapple, raw, all varieties    +65
  • Strawberries, raw   +28
  • Tomatoes, red, ripe, raw, year round average   +14

BEST ANTI-INFLAMMATORY VEGETABLES

  • Broccoli, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt   +222
  • Cabbage, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt   +384
  • Chard, Swiss, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt   +243
  • Carrots, raw   +209
  • Kale, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt   +439
  • Pumpkin, cooked, boiled, drained, without salt   +95
  • Spinach, raw   +78
  • Sweet Potato, cooked, baked in skin, without salt   +378

BEST ANTI-INFLAMMATORY NUTS AND SEEDS

  • Almonds, oil roasted, without salt added   +312
  • Flaxseed   +823
  • Hazelnuts or Filberts   +437
  • Macadamia, oil roasted, without salt  + 636

BEST ANTI-INFLAMMATORY OILS AND FATS

  • Cod liver oil   +16539 *excellent used topically for scar tissue & inflammation
  • Flaxseed oil   +2297
  • Hazelnut oil   +1357
  • Olive oil   +1137
  • Salmon oil   +30284
  • Sunflower oil, high oleic (70% and over)   +1576

BEST ANTI-INFLAMMATORY FISH AND SEAFOOD

  • Anchovy, European, raw   +595
  • Caviar, black and red, granular   +415
  • Herring, Pacific, cooked, dry heat  +1380
  • Mackerel, salted  +2661
  • Roe, mixed species, cooked, dry heat   +1046
  • Salmon, canned, sockeye, drained solids with bone   +2502
  • Shad, American, raw   +1996
  • Trout, Rainbow, wild, cooked, dry heat   +520
  • Tuna, White, canned in water, drained solids   +698

BEST ANTI-INFLAMMATORY SPICES AND HERBS

  • Cayenne pepper   +1481
  • Curry powder   +371
  • Garlic, raw   +4863  *excellent for Sarcoidosis
  • Ginger, ground  +1447
  • Onion, powder   +794
  • Parsley, raw   +301
  • Turmeric, ground   +1523  *excellent for Sarcoidosis

BEST ANTI-INFLAMMATORY GRAIN

  • Amaranth
  • Quinoa (not really considered a grain…but I put it here anyway)
  • Millet
  • Teff
  • Barley

My personal favorite Sarcoidosis diet foods are Tumeric and garlic…you can never have enough garlic!

Should Coconut Oil Be A Part Of Your Sarcoidosis Diet Plan?

You will notice that coconut oil is not listed above because nutritiondata.com thinks that this saturated fat is somehow inflammatory despite the fact that it doesn’t generate free radicals and can’t be used to make eicosanoids.  I think everyone should be using coconut oil internally and topically for all the numerous health benefits and I include 20+ more highly effective anti-tumor foods along with 30 simple recipes & 10 expert audio interviews in my total wellness series which helps people with Sarcoidosis get better results, avoid side effects & save money!

One of the interviews with Jeffrey Zavick of ImmunoLabs explains why one simple food intolerance test could prevent all chronic disease from manifesting and save millions of lives.  Click sarcoidosis natural treatment to preview our wellness series and start thinking outside the prescription with us.

If you are looking for all this information and more, including Sarcoidosis diet recipes, how to relieve pain, increase energy & reduce coughing naturally, be sure to get this series.  It’s the Sarcoidosis survival guide we wish we had the day he was diagnosed in 2015.

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