I lost 120 pounds in 12 months see my journey and diet

Any woman who can lose 100 Lbs —and keep it off—knows more than most diet gurus about what you need to eat to burn fat and fight that ever-constant battle against weight regain.. Set at 1,200 calories and under 25 grams of carbs per Weight Loss Meal Plan, this plan is considered very low-calorie and moderately low-carbohydrate. It’s you eat at least 1,200 calories per day in order to support your body’s basic metabolic needs.

Diet Adviser Signs And Symptoms Journeys.

Maximize your weight loss by following a low-calorie, low-carbohydrate meal plan. Set at 1,200 calories and under 25 grams of carbs per meal, this plan is considered very low-calorie and moderately low-carbohydrate. It’s you eat at least 1,200 calories per day in order to support your body’s basic metabolic needs.

Benefits of the Meal Plan

These meal plans combine the advantage of a low-carb approach with a low calorie meal plan. These two strategies together can accelerate weight loss, helping you achieve quick results. A 2011 study showed that eating a low-carb diet can help reduce hunger, which is essential if you are following a very low calorie plan of 1200 calories per day. If you can see results for your efforts while experiencing minimal hunger, you are more likely to stick to the plan and less likely to stray down paths with foods higher in calories. Motivation is a key factor in any weight control plan.

Following the Meal Plan

To follow this plan, divide your allotted 1200 calories into three meals of 300 calories each and three snacks of 100 calories each. The steady flow of food keeps you feeling sated throughout the day. The best way to ensure you are adhering to calorie and carb counts is by weighing your food on a kitchen scale or measuring it carefully. Snacks are. It is imperative to ensure you never get to a point where you feel starved or shaky. You are also less likely to feel deprived if you eat every couple of hours. You may notice this plan does not include alcohol. In order to maximize nutritional intake, the 1200 calorie low carb meal plan leaves no room for empty calories. Every calorie must have value when you reduce caloric intake to this level

 The Meal Plan

Each meal and snack includes a few options to give you some variety. For maximum nutritional benefit, try to vary your meal plan each day. Variety helps ensure you do not become bored with your diet, and eating a variety of foods across the spectrum of color will ensure you get all of the vitamins and minerals you need. The diet plan is low carb rather than no carb. Carbohydrates are essential for metabolism and many other vital body processes. Because vegetables, particularly leafy greens, are low in both carbohydrates and calories, they figure strongly into these meal plans.

Low-carbohydrate meals are those with less than 25 grams of carbs per meal. In many cases, the meals listed below have lower effective carbohydrate counts because fiber is counted as a carbohydrate as far as nutritional information goes, but it does not affect blood sugar the way other carbohydrates do. Carbohydrates listed are total and not effective carb rates. Meals are between 250 and 300 calories with snacks totaling the same. Feel free to mix and match for a meal plan that will maintain you at around 1,200 calories per day with low carbohydrate counts. To use the meals below, select one breakfast, lunch, dinner, and three snacks.

 Weight Control

Limiting your calorie intake is one effective way to lose weight. Combining low calorie options with foods low in carbs can help you achieve your weight goals that much quicker.

Following the Meal Plan

To follow this plan, divide your allotted 1200 calories into three meals of 300 calories each and three snacks of 100 calories each. The steady flow of food keeps you feeling sated throughout the day. The best way to ensure you are adhering to calorie and carb counts is by weighing your food on a kitchen scale or measuring it carefully. Snacks are. It is imperative to ensure you never get to a point where you feel starved or shaky. You are also less likely to feel deprived if you eat every couple of hours. You may notice this plan does not include alcohol. In order to maximize nutritional intake, the 1200 calorie low carb meal plan leaves no room for empty calories. Every calorie must have value when you reduce caloric intake to this level

Savory Rabbit

Savory Rabbit Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 rabbit, cut into portions
  • 3 medium slices streaky bacon, chopped
  • 2 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 garlic cloves, chopped
  • large sprig each fresh rosemary and sage chopped
  • 2 glasses white wine
  • 400 g / 14 oz canned plum tomatoes, chopped or sieved
  • 1 tsp sugar
  • salt and black pepper

Directions

  1. Soak the rabbit for a couple of hours in cold, slightly salted water.
  2. Drain and pat dry with kitchen towel.
  3. Brown the bacon in a thick-bottom saucepan in the olive oil.
  4. Add the rabbit pieces and brown all over before adding the garlic and herbs.
  5. Sauté for a few more minutes, then add the win allowing it to bubble for a few minutes.
  6. Add the tomatoes and sugar, season with salt and black pepper and simmer ½ with the lid slightly askew for about 1½ hrs.
  7. If the sauce gets too thick during cooking, add a little more wine. Serve with creamy mashed potatoes and a green salad.

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Psoriasis: New Treatments Help Millions Manage Common Skin Condition

For years, psoriasis suffers have battled patches of rough, reddened, and intensely itchy skin that can cause pain as well embarrassment, with little hope of relief.

But major breakthroughs have been logged in the treatment of this potentially debilitating disorder that affects almost 10 million Americans, including small children. And if you are suffering from the disease, it’s time to take action.

To spotlight the treatments that have emerged in recent years, the National Psoriasis Foundation is observing National Psoriasis Action month in August.

The NPF Foundation wants to spread the word that there have been tremendous advancements in the number of treatment options for people living with the condition. The NPF has even launched a website to educate patients, caregivers and health care professionals about the resources to treat psoriatic disease.

“Throughout August, people impacted by psoriasis can participate in interactive quizzes that will help them better understand and manage their disease,” Dr. Michael Siegel, Ph.D, vice president of Research Programs at the NPF tells Newsmax Health.

“Psoriasis often develops between the ages of 15 and 35, but it can develop at any age. While scientists do not know exactly what causes psoriasis, it is known that the immune system and genetics play major roles in its development.

“Usually, something triggers the condition to flare. The skin cells in people with psoriasis grow at an abnormally fast rate, which leads to painful lesions on the body.”

The genetic link is clear, says Siegal.

“If one parent has psoriasis, there is about a 10 percent chance of a child contracting it. If both parents have psoriasis, the chance increases to 50 percent,” he notes.

Dr. Kenneth Beer, associate clinical professor of dermatology at the University of Miami, tells Newsmax Health that the No. 1 myth about psoriasis is that it is just “dry skin.”

“It’s far more than that,” he says. “Psoriasis is an immune disease in which the body stimulates growth of skin cells in an abnormal way. It is largely genetic and may be associated with stress, infection medication or a range of other issues. In addition to affecting the skin, it can frequently affect the joints of the body.”

Another myth is that the condition is contagious. Not so, says Beer. And while it is not curable at this point in time, it is manageable and treatable. But if you don’t take care of your psoriasis, it can lead to serious medical conditions.

According to the Mayo Clinic, people with psoriasis are at a great risk for Type 2 diabetes as well as vision problems and heart disease. About 30 percent of people who have psoriasis will develop psoriatic arthritis, according to the NPF.

Reality TV star Kim Kardashian revealed that she suffers from the condition and that stress plays a key role in her flare-ups of psoriasis. Two-time Grammy winning songstress LeAnn Rimes kept her struggle hidden until 2008 when she decided to open up about her experience as part of the “Stop Hiding, Start Living” awareness campaign sponsored by Abbott, which makes the psoriasis drug, Humira.

Other celebs with psoriasis include comedian Jon Lovitz and “Leave it to Beaver” star Jerry Mathers, who admits that the condition is “no laughing matter.”

Dr. Gundry reveals the top 3 common foods that you would have never guessed were the cause of your fatigue.

Siegel says that treating psoriasis involves good disease management and paying attention overall health.

“With advances in the number of treatment options available today for people living with psoriasis it’s easier than ever to treat the condition,” he says. “The biggest breakthrough came 10 years ago with the introduction of injectable biologics which changed the lives of patients and their providers.

“By targeting specific pathways in the immune system, these biologics have demonstrated remarkable outcomes in clinical trials. Moving forward, scientists are likely to reveal even more effective treatments and will be able to harness the same targeted therapy for oral and topical treatments as well.”

Some examples of biologic drugs to treat psoriasis include Humira, Enbrel, and Remicade.

Siegel says that some people believe that eliminating certain foods from their diet, such as gluten, dairy, sugar, or red meat can reduce inflammation and therefore lower their chances of a psoriatic flare.

“Others believe that consuming certain vitamins, herbs and supplements, such as fish oil or turmeric, can do the same,” he says. “The truth is that there is not enough scientific evidence to substantiate these claims, and the medical community doesn’t know for sure how diet impacts psoriatic disease.

“What the medical community does agree on, however, is that people with psoriatic disease should maintain a healthy weight, and that’s where diet and exercise can play and important role. Research has found that maintaining a healthy weight lowers the risk of developing co-morbidities or related health conditions like diabetes or cardiovascular disease.”

Siegel says that another big myth about psoriasis is that there isn’t a treatment available for patients to achieve clear or nearly clear skin.

“This is simply not true,” he says. “There have been tremendous advancements and there are currently a number of safe, effective and affordable options. The first step people living with psoriasis should take is to work with their health care provider to discuss a treatment strategy. By following a goal-oriented, trackable treatment strategy, people living with psoriasis should expect to begin seeing results in three to six months.”

Adds Beer: “Psoriasis is now one of the most researched skin diseases and each year we get better and better treatments. See your dermatologist to get more information.”

© 2017 NewsmaxHealth. All rights reserved.


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With the click of a camera, USC professor tracks New York City’s transit development

Date:July 17, 2017

Source:University of Southern California

Martin Krieger took an unconventional approach to studying transit-oriented development around New York City Subway stations. He picked up a camera and snapped tens of thousands of photographs.

“The people who talk about transit-oriented development have a very lovely image of a little village where people would work and reside and shop, and there would be more walking and less automobile commuting — and there may be truth to that,” said Krieger, professor of planning at the USC Price School of Public Policy. “But I thought it would be useful to look at what the world was really like.”

He systematically visited the ends of the subway lines and several other carefully selected stations. He took photographs from elevated lines looking out over the neighborhoods and streets along the way, then walked through the stations’ nearby streets, documenting actual patterns of development.

“This was not what we call a statistical study,” he said. “It was largely meant to make people think twice.”

Diverse Development

Through the lens of his camera, he witnessed a tremendous diversity of development surrounding New York City Subway stations.

“One station at the end of the line has a golf course and a cemetery — I think that’s Woodlawn,” he said. “Another station in Flushing is an extraordinarily vital Asian-American shopping area. I even made a movie of a man chopping roast duck. Several of the lines end in industrial areas. They don’t look like transit villages, nor are they going to be. So it’s quite diverse.”

The photos will end up in the USC Libraries’ Digital Library, where they will serve as a visual record to inform other researchers in their analyses of development in New York City. He intends to embark on future photographic projects documenting development around large, complex transit systems in other major cities.

“People ask me, ‘Well, why don’t you write an article about transit-oriented development?’ Actually, my real work is to set up the information and the curiosity so others can do it,” he said.

Adding Perspective

Over the past two decades, Krieger has also systematically photographed aspects of Los Angeles’ urban landscape, including industrial areas, swap meets and storefront churches. These photographs are also preserved in the USC Libraries’ archives and are being digitized with support from a grant from the Haynes Foundation.

Krieger has also written about how systematic photographic documentation can inform urban planning in his book Urban Tomographies and in articles published in the Journal of Planning, Education and Research.

“‘Go look’ is my basic principle,” he said.

He’s extended this principle into his teaching. As part of his spring 2017 freshman seminar called “Los Angeles as a City,” he sent the students out to take photographs, record sounds and make videos of the transit-oriented development around Los Angeles’ Metro stations, as well as of other places and phenomena.

“I just want to get them to understand it’s worth going to look,” he said. “They would have never have gone to these places and, you know, these places and people are all interesting. And we have to learn to see the world as interesting.”


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Drinking coffee could lead to a longer life, scientist says

Whether it’s caffeinated or decaffeinated, coffee is associated with lower mortality, which suggests the association is not tied to caffeine

Date:July 16, 2017

Source:University of Southern California

Summary: Scientists have found that people who drink coffee appear to live longer. Drinking coffee was associated with lower risk of death due to heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and kidney disease. People who consumed a cup of coffee a day were 12 percent less likely to die compared to those who didn’t drink coffee. This association was even stronger for those who drank two to three cups a day — 18 percent reduced chance of death.

 

Here’s another reason to start the day with a cup of joe: Scientists have found that people who drink coffee appear to live longer.

Drinking coffee was associated with a lower risk of death due to heart disease, cancer, stroke, diabetes, and respiratory and kidney disease for African-Americans, Japanese-Americans, Latinos and whites.

People who consumed a cup of coffee a day were 12 percent less likely to die compared to those who didn’t drink coffee. This association was even stronger for those who drank two to three cups a day — 18 percent reduced chance of death.

Lower mortality was present regardless of whether people drank regular or decaffeinated coffee, suggesting the association is not tied to caffeine, said Veronica W. Setiawan, lead author of the study and an associate professor of preventive medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC.

“We cannot say drinking coffee will prolong your life, but we see an association,” Setiawan said. “If you like to drink coffee, drink up! If you’re not a coffee drinker, then you need to consider if you should start.”

The study, which will be published in the July 11 issue of Annals of Internal Medicine, used data from the Multiethnic Cohort Study, a collaborative effort between the University of Hawaii Cancer Center and the Keck School of Medicine.

The ongoing Multiethnic Cohort Study has more than 215,000 participants and bills itself as the most ethnically diverse study examining lifestyle risk factors that may lead to cancer.

“Until now, few data have been available on the association between coffee consumption and mortality in nonwhites in the United States and elsewhere,” the study stated. “Such investigations are important because lifestyle patterns and disease risks can vary substantially across racial and ethnic backgrounds, and findings in one group may not necessarily apply to others.”

Since the association was seen in four different ethnicities, Setiawan said it is safe to say the results apply to other groups.

“This study is the largest of its kind and includes minorities who have very different lifestyles,” Setiawan said. “Seeing a similar pattern across different populations gives stronger biological backing to the argument that coffee is good for you whether you are white, African-American, Latino or Asian.”

Benefits of drinking coffee

Previous research by USC and others have indicated that drinking coffee is associated with reduced risk of several types of cancer, diabetes, liver disease, Parkinson’s disease, Type 2 diabetes and other chronic diseases.

Setiawan, who drinks one to two cups of coffee daily, said any positive effects from drinking coffee are far-reaching because of the number of people who enjoy or rely on the beverage every day.

“Coffee contains a lot of antioxidants and phenolic compounds that play an important role in cancer prevention,” Setiawan said. “Although this study does not show causation or point to what chemicals in coffee may have this ‘elixir effect,’ it is clear that coffee can be incorporated into a healthy diet and lifestyle.”

About 62 percent of Americans drink coffee daily, a 5 percent increase from 2016 numbers, reported the National Coffee Association.

As a research institution, USC has scientists from across disciplines working to find a cure for cancer and better ways for people to manage the disease.

The Keck School of Medicine and USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center manage a state-mandated database called the Los Angeles Cancer Surveillance Program, which provides scientists with essential statistics on cancer for a diverse population.

Researchers from the USC Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center have found that drinking coffee lowers the risk of colorectal cancer.

But drinking piping hot coffee or beverages probably causes cancer in the esophagus, according to a World Health Organization panel of scientists that included Mariana Stern from the Keck School of Medicine.

Hearing from the WHO

In some respects, coffee is regaining its honor for wellness benefits. After 25 years of labeling coffee a carcinogen linked to bladder cancer, the World Health Organization last year announced that drinking coffee reduces the risk for liver and uterine cancer.

“Some people worry drinking coffee can be bad for you because it might increase the risk of heart disease, stunt growth or lead to stomach ulcers and heartburn,” Setiawan said. “But research on coffee have mostly shown no harm to people’s health.”

Coffee by the numbers

Setiawan and her colleagues examined the data of 185,855 African-Americans (17 percent), Native Hawaiians (7 percent), Japanese-Americans (29 percent), Latinos (22 percent) and whites (25 percent) ages 45 to 75 at recruitment. Participants answered questionnaires about diet, lifestyle, and family and personal medical history.

They reported their coffee drinking habits when they entered the study and updated them about every five years, checking one of nine boxes that ranged from “never or hardly ever” to “4 or more cups daily.” They also reported whether they drank caffeinated or decaffeinated coffee. The average follow-up period was 16 years.

Sixteen percent of participants reported that they did not drink coffee, 31 percent drank one cup per day, 25 percent drank two to three cups per day and 7 percent drank four or more cups per day. The remaining 21 percent had irregular coffee consumption habits.

Over the course of the study, 58,397 participants — about 31 percent — died. Cardiovascular disease (36 percent) and cancer (31 percent) were the leading killers.

The data was adjusted for age, sex, ethnicity, smoking habits, education, preexisting disease, vigorous physical exercise and alcohol consumption.

Setiawan’s previous research found that coffee reduces the risk of liver cancer and chronic liver disease. She is currently examining how coffee is associated with the risk of developing specific cancers.

Researchers from the University of Hawaii Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute contributed to this study. The study used data from the Multiethnic Cohort Study, which is supported by a $19,008,359 grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.


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The All-Natural Way to REVERSE Rheumatoid Arthritis Doctors Are in Complete Denial About

If you or someone you know has rheumatoid arthritis (Rheumatoid Arthritis), you’ll want to watch this video. In it, Sarah Allen, who is a former patient of mine, shares how she put rheumatoid arthritis into remission, and it’s a remarkable success story.

Rheumatoid arthritis was a passion of mine while I was still in active practice. I treated over 3,000 patients with this disease. I estimate 80 to 85 percent of them experienced significant recovery, if not remission, like Sarah did.

I ran into Sarah after giving a presentation recently in Orlando, where she happened to be in attendance. After talking to her, I decided we needed to share her important story as it would provide hope for so many who struggle with this disease.

She first came to see me in August of 2003. Even though she was only 28 years old at the time, she’d been experiencing symptoms of RA for about three or four years.
“I thought I was very healthy,’ she says. ‘I was young. I was a competitive triathlete. I believed I had a pretty good diet. So, I didn’t really understand why I was experiencing so much pain in my fingers and in my feet.

I had migrating pain, and a lot of tendonitis issues all throughout my body. It took the Western doctors a long time to diagnose me. It took about three years going to different doctors before they knew what was wrong.

It didn’t show in my blood; I didn’t have the RA factor, and my C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were normal. But it showed up on an X-ray.’”

Hallmark Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis

One of the hallmark symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis is pain in your hands and/or feet. It tends to affect the proximal joints more so than the distal ones, i.e. the joints closest to your palm, for example, opposed to the joints further out in the fingers.

The Art of Camouflage After Breast Cancer Surgery

Recently, while walking through a sporting goods store, I was intrigued by all of the camouflaged garments. I listened as my daughter’s boyfriend explained about the importance of hiding from the deer.

“In order to be in position for a kill,” he said, “you have to hide in plain sight.” He told us about how hunters used camouflaged clothing and blinds to be near the deer without exposing themselves. There was an art to hunting and it took great skill to get close to a wild animal, especially one with a keen sense of smell. I continued listening as he talked, and that’s what got me to thinking about the art of camouflage.

Since having both breasts removed, I was in the minority of the post-breast cancer world. Most of the women I talked to had chosen to go the route of reconstruction. They were young and wanted to keep their breasts. Instead of just having their breasts lopped off and being forever flat, they went through the complicated process of reconstruction. After having breasts removed, tissue expanders were inserted for those choosing to have silicone or saline implants. For those choosing to use their own body fat to make new breasts, the choice between DIEP flap or TRAM flap had to be made. Surgeries were complicated and painful, but each woman chose what worked best for her. My choice was pretty cut and dry. I wanted them taken off and wanted to be done with cancer forever. I wanted a once-and-done kind of surgery.  

Medical Marijuana and Its Effects on Multiple Sclerosis Caused Spasticity

autoimmune_attack_graphic

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. MS affects approximately 3.0 million people globally, with about 300,000 cases in the United States. Twice as many women as men have MS. The average ages for onset of MS is 20-40 years. In MS, cells in the immune system attack and destroy myelin, the fatty tissue surrounding nerve cells (http://www.phylomed.com/MS.html). Scar tissue replaces the myelin, interfering with the transmission of nerve signals and leading to numbness, fatigue, spasticity, loss of muscle control, and various other debilitating symptoms. There are four broad theories concerning the etiology of MS. The immune system, environment, viral infections, and genetics are possible factors attributed to the cause of MS.

Spasticity refers to an increase in muscle tone that causes muscle stiffness or spasms (Sibley, 105). There are two types of spasticity prevalent in people with MS: phasic spasms and a sustained increase in muscle tone. Phasic spasms sub-categorize into two types of spasticity: flexor and extensor. In flexor spasticity, the hips and knees of the person bend forward, due to tightening of the hamstrings. In extensor spasticity, the legs of the patient cross over at the ankles or lock together, with the hips and knees remaining rigid (http://www.nmss.org/msinfo/cmsi/spasticity.html). Spasms also occur less frequently in the arms, backs, and necks of people with MS. Both types of spasticity debilitate patients and lead to difficulties in performing daily tasks. Phasic spasms disrupt the balance of the patient and can cause severe pain.

10 Things for Parents to Know About the 2016-2017 Flu Vaccine

 

It’s time to get flu shots for your family before your house is full of fevers and dripping noses.

 

1.  The flu vaccine is essential for children.

The flu virus is common and unpredictable, and it can cause serious complications and death, even in healthy children. Immunization each year is the best way to protect children.

Each year, on average, 5% to 20% of the U.S. population gets the flu and more than 200,000 people are hospitalized from complications. At least 77 children died from the flu in the 2015-2016 season, although the actual number is probably much higher since many flu deaths aren’t reported and are caused by secondary flu complications such as pneumonia. If you choose not to vaccinate your child, you not only endanger your own child but also others.

Although influenza can be treated with antiviral medications, these drugs are less effective if not started early, can be expensive, and may have bothersome side effects.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) strongly recommends annual influenza immunization for all people ages 6 months and older, including children and adolescents. In addition, household contacts and out-of-home caregivers of children with high risk conditions and all children under the age of 5 especially should be vaccinated.

Young children, people with asthma, heart disease, diabetes, weakened immune systems, and pregnant women are at high risk for complications of influenza, such aspneumonia.

About half of all Americans get vaccinated against the flu each year, including 50% of pregnant women. This number needs to get better. Ask your child’s school, child care center, or sports coach, “How are we promoting the flu vaccine for these children?”